Activity Workshop
 

BBC Catchphrase Lessons 7-12

These audio lessons make up the second set of 6 lessons in the BBC's "Catchphrase" course for learning Welsh. This works exactly like the first 6 lessons, but without converting the course notes.

You may want to run through certain lessons more than once, either with or without looking at the subtitles, and try to build up the sentences yourself before reading the answer. If you need more time, the pause button is your friend, and you can drag the time marker back to repeat sections as you wish.

The second set of six lessons covers the following:

  1. Where do you come from?
  2. Greetings and smalltalk about the weather
  3. Where do you live and work?
  4. More about the weather
  5. Talking about Christmas using "wedi"
  6. Using the past tense of "mynd"

The course notes aren't repeated here as they were for the first five lessons, but you can still use the BBC's course notes by clicking on the appropriate .rtf links. You'll need some office program like LibreOffice to use these, but you can then convert them to txt or html if you wish. Just watch out for the þ and ð characters which may try to confuse you.


Gwers saith - Lesson 7

Where do you come from (originally), and where do other members of your family come from? Includes soft mutations caused by the word "o" ("from").

To use the files separately, you'll need the .mp3 (from the BBC), together with the .srt subtitles file. And possibly also the .rtf file for the BBC's notes.


Gwers wyth - Lesson 8

Asking about members of the family, like have you got brothers or sisters or children, and where does he or she work?

Here we see how to say a number of children (where "plant" means "children"), and we don't use the word "plant" at all, but the singular "plentyn", so we say "two child", "three child" and so on. Except, of course, depending on which number it is, the word "plentyn" gets mutated to "phlentyn" or maybe "blentyn", or maybe stays "plentyn". I wonder if rules like that will disappear as part of the living Welsh language?

To use the files separately, you'll need the .mp3 (from the BBC), together with the .srt subtitles file. And possibly also the .rtf file for the BBC's notes.


Gwers naw - Lesson 9

Phone numbers, car numbers and house numbers. What's your phone number, and what's the number of Basil's house?

To use the files separately, you'll need the .mp3 (from the BBC), together with the .srt subtitles file. And possibly also the .rtf file for the BBC's notes.


Gwers deg - Lesson 10

This repeats a lot of the weather vocabulary from lesson 2 and adds the past tense to talk about yesterday's weather too.

To use the files separately, you'll need the .mp3 (from the BBC), together with the .srt subtitles file. And possibly also the .rtf file for the BBC's notes.


Gwers unarddeg - Lesson 11

Here we use "wedi" to talk about things we have done or haven't done in preparation for Christmas, like sending cards and ordering the turkey.

If you're curious why this is numbered "unarddeg" instead of "un deg un" as you'd expect, it turns out there's a horribly complicated and arbitrary numbering system lurking behind the "decimal" system we've learnt earlier. So in this alternative scheme you have to say "one on top of ten", and the "ar" for "on top of" leads to the "deg" mutating to "ddeg". Don't worry, it gets a lot worse than this later!

Also tucked away in this lesson is the realisation that even though the word for "tree" is "coeden", if you want to say "the tree" then it magically mutates into "y goeden". And this soft mutation happens to all female nouns after a "the". Of course mutations happen in boatloads of other situations too, but this one is quite prevalent, and goes some way towards explaining why the cartoon "the little princess" is "y dywysoges fach" instead of "tywysoges".

To use the files separately, you'll need the .mp3 (from the BBC), together with the .srt subtitles file. And possibly also the .rtf file for the BBC's notes.


Gwers deuddeg - Lesson 12

The past tense of the verb "mynd" (to go), talking about going to places, going swimming and so on.

Again, this is "deuddeg" instead of "un deg dau" as you'd expect, and you've probably noticed that "two on top of ten" sounds very similar to "dau ddeg" which is the more logical way of saying "twenty" (two lots of ten).

To use the files separately, you'll need the .mp3 (from the BBC), together with the .srt subtitles file. And possibly also the .rtf file for the BBC's notes.